As an “Abundant Life Coach” I get asked about the meaning of “financial abundance” very often. What this means to you can be the difference between living the lifestyle of your dreams, or settling for something less than your dreams. I want you to live the life of your dreams!

Here, then, are 5 Essential Factors of Financial Abundance:

“The Abundant Mindset”

Thousands upon thousands of books, articles, media, programs, and so much more have been produced that discuss the awesome power of our minds, and the influence of our thinking upon our lives. It is difficult to say enough or emphasize enough that truth. As I see it, we are exactly as we think.

In my work, I recommend the adoption of an “Abundant” mindset. This means so much more than finance or money, however, for the purposes of this article, I will discuss abundance only as it applies to the world of money and finance.

A financial abundance mindset means enjoying an abundant amount of money, and yet not allowing greed. Greed does not work (sorry, Gordon Gekko). Of course “financial abundance” will be a relative concept; it will probably mean something different to each person. Greed, however, is fairly obvious; it is almost like knowing (within your mid or heart) the difference between right and wrong.

Further, a financial abundance mindset means having the monetary means or resources to enjoy an abundant lifestyle, yet balancing your financial wealth with philanthropy and generous giving (see point 4). When one’s personal motives are clearly defined and one’s goals are aligned with those motives, then financial abundance becomes clear.

“Specialized Knowledge”

The largest difference between the rich and poor (or the “haves” and “have-nots”) is knowledge. Or, more specifically, the largest difference is a specialized knowledge; meaning that they have the “right” knowledge and also know how to use that knowledge to their advantage. In other words, specialized knowledge is the information or data itself, coupled with the wisdom to know how to use the information or data.

For many, specialized knowledge is an academic education such as medical or law school, while for others this might mean computer programming, aviation repair, or something. Further, many of those with a financial education know how to leverage their own money to make more money. Obviously the point is that specialized knowledge translates to earning ability.

“The Power of Compounding Interest and Investing”

For many people, diligent savings and investment of a consistent percentage of income over considerable lengths of time has lead to financial abundance. I would certainly add that economic factors always play a significant role with regard to risk in investments. Even so, living well within one’s means while investing and saving can very often lead to financial abundance.

“Generous Giving”

Generosity does not necessarily mean giving away or donating money. Mr. Zig Ziglar has said: “If you can dream it, then you can achieve it. You will get all you want in life if you help enough other people get what they want.”

This is so very true. It must be an unwritten law of nature that over time, our generosity is paid back several times over. Of course there are exceptions to every rule, and yet employing an attitude of generosity is always a safe bet for a great return. And, if nothing else, it is an illustration of excellence of character.

“What You Love Over Time”

We should seek ways to turn what we love to do into a good living. I am a firm believer that when we do what we love doing, money very often comes as a byproduct, because our focus is not so much on making money as it is on enjoyment and lifestyle. Over time, money tends to take care of itself in large part when we are doing what we enjoy, especially when it helps others.

In conclusion, the very first point – having an abundant mindset – sums up all of the points I have made in this article. When we do what we love to do; when we are generous and seek to help others; when we live within our means and save money; when we always seek a more specialized knowledge…we then have an abundant mindset, and are bound to realize financial abundance.

Quite a few people have written to me asking how to use Reiki to bring abundance, prosperity and/or

financial success into their lives. This article is a somewhat shortened version of my blog entry on this

matter. Please click on the link below to read the longer version.

I’m going to present a few ideas for using Reiki to achieve abundance, prosperity and/or financial success.

But before I do that, I want to mention that this is one area where Reiki and Feng Shui go together very

nicely. Many books on Feng Shui specifically tell you how to set up your environment to encourage abundance and prosperity.

I do want to acknowledge something before I continue my discussion. To some people, speaking of Reiki and money or Reiki and financial success in the same breath makes them cringe. They view Reiki as pure Love, a spiritual calling, and to introduce the idea of money into the sacred realm of Reiki is abhorrent to them. If that is your viewpoint, I completely understand and respect your position. I have known healers in many fields who have felt the same way.

But I am a bit more of a pragmatist and a realist. I recognize that we need to make a living and we need to support our families. Even more importantly, I realize the negative effects poverty and monetary insecurity can have on us.

When a person feels financially uncertain, even endangered, that person may find it very hard to pay attention to the spiritual aspects of his/her life. If someone has so much financial worry, thoughts of “How will I pay the bills?” and “Will we lose the house?” may occupy so much of that person’s energy and time that they can scarcely think about things like helping others heal.

Does this mean that poor people and people with financial difficulties can’t be spiritual and can’t help others heal? Of course it doesn’t mean that. However, survival issues can become paramount, and for many, many people, these issues interfere with their ability to give any of their energy to spiritual and healing issues. We are all human, with a limited amount of energy and resources available to us at any given time.

But beyond this, I don’t believe there is anything inherently wrong in the desire for abundance, prosperity

and financial security. We live in a world that is run by money; that is the reality we live with, no matter

how much we might wish it were otherwise. Without sufficient money, we are in deep trouble! When we have sufficient money, we can turn our attention more easily to helping others.

Everyone has to define what the term “sufficient money” means to them. For example, I am not fond of the idea of using Reiki to win the lottery, or to win at gambling. Frankly, I don’t like the energy of gambling, because so many people’s lives are ruined by gambling.

Having said that, however, I leave it up to you to decide how much money is “sufficient”. The people who

contact me about using Reiki for prosperity usually want to have enough money to pay their bills on time and provide a good home for their families. Some of them have started Reiki and other healing practices, and want those practices to be financially successful so that they can both help others and support their

families.

The term “abundance” is also open to interpretation. Abundance is not necessarily the same thing as having a lot of money, or being very prosperous. Each person has to decide what “abundance” means to them. Someone who does not have a lot of money but who has a lot of friendship and love might feel that their life is filled with abundance. Having a sense of abundance allows us to feel content with what we have. That assumes, of course, that we don’t struggle to find the money to eat every day, or we don’t live in an unsafe place.

You can use Reiki to attract abundance and prosperity towards you in many ways. Here are a few suggestions:

1. Draw the Reiki Power Symbol and the Long Distance symbol on a piece of paper, and place them in your wallet or purse. Every time you see them there, think of abundance/prosperity being drawn to you across time and distance. You can also place these symbols in a jar of coins and tuck one in the back of your checkbook.

2. Draw the Power Symbol on your Palm Chakras each morning. This will serve as a symbolic reminder of how money changes hands, and it will help draw that money toward your hands.

3. Use Aventurine stones or Malachite stones, both of which are often used to represent money. Place the

stone in one hand while you draw the Power and/or Long Distance Symbol over that hand with your other hand. Concentrate on the idea of wealth flowing toward you. Leave the stones near your checkbook, purse, wallet, etc.

4. Using the Long-Distance Symbol, you can send Reiki into the future for your finances. In other words, you can send positive energy into the future. You can also use the Long-Distance Symbol to go backwards in time to help heal some of the emotional toll that financial difficulties have taken on you.

5. If you have a business, you can draw the Power Symbol and/or Long-Distance Symbol in the air in the

corners of your place of business, over the cash register or credit card machine, etc. Leave small

Aventurine or Malachite stones that you have charged with Reiki near the register or credit card terminal.

There are several Chakras that are important to pay attention to in money matters:

1. The Palm Chakras – since money literally “changes hands”.

2. The Third Eye Chakra – because it’s the seat of your intuition, and it can help you make good decisions

about your future.

3. The Solar Plexus Chakra – because it’s the place of your inner wisdom, your “gut feelings”, and it can

help you determine whether something is a good or bad financial decision for you.

4. Be sure to focus on your Root Chakra, too, if self-confidence (or lack of it) is an issue. Your Root

Chakra is also important if past financial problems have disturbed your sense of stability and security (and

made you less confident as a result).

The subject of Reiki for abundance, prosperity and financial success is complex and multi-faceted. I have

just scratched the surface with this discussion. Please feel free to sign up for my newsletter to learn more

ways that Reiki can help you in your everyday life.

Accounting is usually seen as having two distinct strands, Management and Financial accounting. Management accounting, which seeks to meet the needs of managers and Financial accounting, which seeks to meet the accounting needs of all of the other users. The differences between the two types of accounting reflect the different user groups that they address. Briefly, the major differences are as follows:

    • Nature of the reports produced. Financial accounting reports tend to be general purpose. That is, they contain financial information that will be useful for a broad range of users and decisions rather than being specifically designed for the needs of a particular group or set of decisions. Management accounting reports, on the other hand, are often for a specific purpose. They are designed either with a particular decision in mind or for a particular manager.

 

    • Level of detail. Financial reports provide users with a broad overview of the performance and position of the business for a period. As a result, information is aggregated and detail is often lost. Management accounting reports, however, often provide managers with considerable detail to help them with a particular operational decision.

 

    • Regulations. Financial reports, for many businesses, are subject to accounting regulations that try to ensure they are produced with standard content and in a standard format. Law and accounting rule setters impose these regulations. Since management accounting reports are for internal use only, there are no regulations from external sources concerning the form and content of the reports. They can be designed to meet the needs of particular managers.

 

    • Reporting interval. For most businesses, financial accounting reports are produced on an annual basis, though many large businesses produce half-yearly reports and a few produce quarterly ones. Management accounting reports may be produced as frequently as required by managers. In many businesses, managers are provided with certain reports on a monthly, weekly or even daily basis, which allows them to check progress frequently. In addition, special-purpose reports will be prepared when required (for example, to evaluate a proposal to purchase a piece of machinery).

 

    • Time horizon. Financial reports reflect the performance and position of the business for the past period. In essence, they are backward looking. Management accounting reports, on the other hand, often provide information concerning future performance as well as past performance. It is an oversimplification, however, to suggest that financial accounting reports never incorporate expectations concerning the future. Occasionally, businesses will release projected information to other users in an attempt to raise capital or to fight off unwanted takeover bids.

 

  • Range and quality of information. Financial accounting reports concentrate on information that can be quantified in monetary terms. Management accounting also produces such reports, but is also more likely to produce reports that contain information of a non-financial nature such as measures of physical quantities of inventories (stocks) and output. Financial accounting places greater emphasis on the use of objective, verifiable evidence when preparing reports. Management accounting reports may use information that is less objective and verifiable, but they provide managers with the information they need.

We can see from this that management accounting is less constrained than financial accounting. It may draw on a variety of sources and use information that has varying degrees of reliability. The only real test to be applied when assessing the value of the information produced for managers is whether or not it improves the quality of the decisions made.

The distinction between the two areas reflects, to some extent, the differences in access to financial information. Managers have much more control over the form and content of information they receive. Other users have to rely on what managers are prepared to provide or what the financial reporting regulations state must be provided. Though the scope of financial accounting reports has increased over time, fears concerning loss of competitive advantage and user ignorance concerning the reliability of forecast data have led businesses to resist providing other users with the detailed and wide-ranging information that is available to managers.

Nobody knows your business better than you do. After all, you are the CEO. You know what the engineers do; you know what the production managers do; and nobody understands the sales process better than you. You know who is carrying their weight and who isn’t. That is, unless we’re talking about the finance and accounting managers.

Most CEO’s, especially in small and mid-size enterprises, come from operational or sales backgrounds. They have often gained some knowledge of finance and accounting through their careers, but only to the extent necessary. But as the CEO, they must make judgments about the performance and competence of the accountants as well as the operations and sales managers.

So, how does the diligent CEO evaluate the finance and accounting functions in his company? All too often, the CEO assigns a qualitative value based on the quantitative message. In other words, if the Controller delivers a positive, upbeat financial report, the CEO will have positive feelings toward the Controller. And if the Controller delivers a bleak message, the CEO will have a negative reaction to the person. Unfortunately, “shooting the messenger” is not at all uncommon.

The dangers inherent in this approach should be obvious. The Controller (or CFO, bookkeeper, whoever) may realize that in order to protect their career, they need to make the numbers look better than they really are, or they need to draw attention away from negative matters and focus on positive matters. This raises the probability that important issues won’t get the attention they deserve. It also raises the probability that good people will be lost for the wrong reasons.

The CEO’s of large public companies have a big advantage when it comes to evaluating the performance of the finance department. They have the audit committee of the board of directors, the auditors, the SEC, Wall Street analyst and public shareholders giving them feedback. In smaller businesses, however, CEO’s need to develop their own methods and processes for evaluating the performance of their financial managers.

Here are a few suggestions for the small business CEO:

Timely and Accurate Financial Reports

Chances are that at some point in your career, you have been advised that you should insist on “timely and accurate” financial reports from your accounting group. Unfortunately, you are probably a very good judge of what is timely, but you may not be nearly as good a judge of what is accurate. Certainly, you don’t have the time to test the recording of transactions and to verify the accuracy of reports, but there are some things that you can and should do.

  • Insist that financial reports include comparisons over a number of periods. This will allow you to judge the consistency of recording and reporting transactions.
  • Make sure that all anomalies are explained.
  • Recurring expenses such as rents and utilities should be reported in the appropriate period. An explanation that – “there are two rents in April because we paid May early” – is unacceptable. The May rent should be reported as a May expense.
  • Occasionally, ask to be reminded about the company’s policies for recording revenues, capitalizing costs, etc.

Beyond Monthly Financial Reports

You should expect to get information from your accounting and finance groups on a daily basis, not just when monthly financial reports are due. Some good examples are:

  • Daily cash balance reports.
  • Accounts receivable collection updates.
  • Cash flow forecasts (cash requirements)
  • Significant or unusual transactions.

Consistent Work Habits

We’ve all known people who took it easy for weeks, then pulled an all-nighter to meet a deadline. Such inconsistent work habits are strong indicators that the individual is not attentive to processes. It also sharply raises the probability of errors in the frantic last-minute activities.

Willingness to Be Controversial

As the CEO, you need to make it very clear to the finance/accounting managers that you expect frank and honest information and that they will not be victims of “shoot the messenger” thinking. Once that assurance is given, your financial managers should be an integral part of your company’s management team. They should not be reluctant to express their opinions and concerns to you or to other department leaders.